Inuit Sila
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Inuit sealskin is one of the most beautiful natural products on earth, and on top of that it is both legal and 100% sustainable.

But more than 40 years of campaigns against seal hunt has dramatically damaged life in the Arctic. Latest the EU ban has collapsed the market, and even though Inuit sealskin is still legal, the export has been reduced by almost 90%. That threatens the foundation of life in the small coastal communities.

See more about the NGO Inuit Sila and get more facts on Inuit seal hunt.

Inuit hunters and fishermen are a proud people with great respect for nature and understanding of animals. But they live far from the decision-makers in Brussels. They need your voice. Support the Arctic hunters and their sustainable lifestyle.


Sign here Pil

Inuit Sila fragment

The foundation of life of the Inuit hunters and their families in the small and distant villages is under serious threat, because they no longer can sell their sealskins.

The seal has always been and still is essential for survival in the Arctic, one of the harshest regions of the world. It is legal to hunt seal throughout the year, and they are an important source of nutrition for both humans and dogs. The skin is used to keep people warm in the cold winters, and the sales of skins are an important source of income.

Since 2006, sales have dropped almost 90%, as a result of animal rights activist campaigns and the EU's introduction of the ban on seal products. The legislation does allow Inuit sealskin, but very few knows about this exemption and the general prohibition has been the major reason retailers completely avoid buying sealskin.

The export of sealskins has dropped by almost 90% within a few years.

The people of the Arctic North have a tradition of seal hunting that goes back thousands of years, and every part of the seal is used.

It would not have been possible for the Inuit to survive the cold Arctic without seals for food, clothing, heat and light.

The seal hunt in the Arctic is 100% sustainable. The catch is around 200,000 seals a year out of a growing seal population of around 12 million.

The population of seals in the world has not been this high since commercial seal hunting began about 200 years ago.

Seal hunting is still an essential part of Inuit culture, and it is strictly monitored by international sustainability organizations.

A seal eats up to 17 kilos of fish a day, and the growing seal population now threatens the fishing.

The count and the catch of seals in the Arctic are monitored professionally and accordingly by organizations that manage marine mammals.

The seal has very few natural enemies. When the amount of seals approaches its natural maximum, hunger, disease and parasites destroy large parts of it.

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Inuit Sila is a campaign by and for Inuit hunters. It supports hunters and their families all over the Arctic.

The campaign is intended to focus on sustainable Inuit seal hunting and draw attention to the impact of the EU's import ban on seal products.

Inuit - means "e;people."e; Generic term for the indigenous people of the Arctic.

Sila - a term that translates into the weather, the mind, consciousness - a world order in which man is in unity, in balance with nature.

Sila is the common life shared by the sea, the wind, the mountains, the animal and the human beings.

When you share consciousness with nature, you treat nature with respect.

Inuit Sila fragment
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Arctic sealskins are beautiful and legal. Support both the Arctic seal hunters and nature by purchasing sealskin.

Sealskin is a unique and beautiful material, which has been used for clothing for thousands of years. The feeling of wearing sealskin cannot be described, it provides warmth in a very different and much more natural way than the industrially produced products used today.

In addition, the sealskin is more eco-friendly than petroleum-based products. Sealskins come from nature and are very durable.

Sealskin and sealskin products from Inuit can be legally imported into the EU, since they are covered by the EU's so-called Inuit exception that allows indigenous people in the Arctic to sell their sealskins in the EU.

Inuit Sila fragment
Inuit Sila
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Since the EU ban, the export of Arctic sealskin has been dramatically reduced by almost 90% even though the sustainable sealskin is still legal. That threatens the foundation of life in the small coastal communities.

Inuit hunters and fishermen are a proud people with great respect and understanding of animals. But they live far from the decision-makers in Brussels. They need your voice. Support the Arctic hunters and their sustainable lifestyle.

Sign here Pil

Inuit Sila fragment
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